Coverart for item
The Resource Life in prairie land, by Eliza W. Farnham ; introduction by John Hallwas

Life in prairie land, by Eliza W. Farnham ; introduction by John Hallwas

Label
Life in prairie land
Title
Life in prairie land
Statement of responsibility
by Eliza W. Farnham ; introduction by John Hallwas
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
  • 977.3/03/0924
  • B
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Index
no index present
LC call number
F545
LC item number
.F23 1988
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
Prairie State books
Label
Life in prairie land, by Eliza W. Farnham ; introduction by John Hallwas
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Reprint. Originally published: New York : Harper, 1846
Bibliography note
Bibliography: p. xxix-xxxv
Contents
  • The first night on board the Banner
  • Style of locomotion
  • Tyler; his peculiarities, ill luck, gait, &c.; his companion
  • Our arrival
  • Street dialogue
  • Discussion of the show
  • Entrance
  • Appearance of the crowd; their motley dress
  • A character; his garb
  • Another; her dress; stature; recognition
  • Her sensibility and comments on the performances
  • The next morning
  • Her description of the male personage before introduced
  • His stories of the wars and himself
  • An invitation
  • The departure for home
  • Discussion of persons and things
  • Legal document
  • Close of the day
  • Delicate foot-print
  • Leaving Prairie Lodge
  • Difficulty of finding another home
  • Speed of our boat
  • What it proves when found
  • Its mistress
  • Her housekeeping
  • Committee on dress
  • A walk
  • What it decides
  • Resignation under desperate circumstances
  • A discovery
  • A cup of joy dashed before it is partaken
  • First night in the Sucker home
  • Junction of the Missouri and Mississippi
  • Room mates, furniture, &c.
  • Pony
  • Rebellion; how maintained
  • Sabbath
  • Next day; its deeds
  • The house; its decorations
  • The surprise anticipated
  • Comment of my neighbor
  • Settled
  • Toilet apparatus
  • Landing at Alton
  • Difficulty of retaining it
  • A new proposition rejected with some spirit at first
  • How acceded to finally
  • Our host; his origin, fortunes, opinions, &c.
  • His daughter Sidney and her husband
  • Their mode of life
  • Sidney's household affairs
  • Her culinary arts
  • How she was initiated into them
  • Fruit groves
  • Unpardonable behavior of the boat under trying circumstances
  • Wanderings in them
  • Serpents
  • Caught in Boots
  • Western housekeeping
  • Another visit
  • Temperate meal
  • The consequence
  • Moonlight nights
  • Coeur de Lion and his suite
  • Their nocturnal ramblings
  • Disaster to the captain
  • Shamefully terminated
  • Coeur de Lion's resignation
  • Better quarters completed
  • Disappointment
  • Housekeeping
  • Architecture of our dwelling
  • Grounds, &c., as described by Mr. F
  • My own picture of them
  • Our neighborhood
  • Interior of the house
  • A specimen of Hooshier indignation
  • The town
  • Our first night at home
  • Housekeeping
  • Purchases; how disposed of
  • Our family
  • Susannah
  • Pony; her artlessness and patience
  • Deserved eulogium
  • Our town; its first settlement
  • Yankees as early settlers
  • Leaving Alton we discover that Jersey is on board
  • Character of our population
  • Political and religious faith
  • Mrs. Esculapius; her remarkable gifts
  • Deacon Cantwyne; his piety, charity, &c.
  • Our village doctor; his wonderful gait
  • His partner Pomp
  • How they did business
  • The doctor's musical efforts
  • Fire on the prairie
  • Wood parties
  • A day on an island
  • The orchard
  • The parrighee of the moon
  • Sporting parties
  • Tragical termination of one
  • The grocery next door to us
  • Horrible event
  • Something more of my housekeeping
  • Making bread
  • My purveyor
  • My first dinner
  • Embarkation for the Illinois
  • Who Jersey is
  • Cook, lamb, &c.
  • Winter on the prairies
  • Sleigh rides
  • Cold houses
  • Fickleness of the climate
  • Deer-hunting in winter
  • Mode of building and style of dwellings
  • Winter evenings
  • Navigation suspended
  • Treacherous ice
  • Some of his experience during his travels
  • Opening of spring
  • A spring night
  • Features and voice of nature
  • Wild fowl
  • Steamboats
  • Magnitude of streams
  • Speculation
  • New arrivals
  • Opening farms
  • Breaking prairie
  • His political opinions
  • Making fence
  • Planting trees
  • Removal
  • Return to Prairie Lodge
  • Painful apprehensions
  • How dispelled
  • Their return
  • Reminiscences of early life
  • The progress of the destroyer
  • The final scene
  • Peculiar style of expressing them
  • Another mission of death
  • Agonizing memories
  • Pestilence abroad
  • Drought
  • Character of the illness caused by it
  • Gloom and grief
  • Dawn of new light
  • Birds and animals of prairie land
  • The gopher; its curious habits
  • Prairie fox
  • His notions on travel
  • Prairie dog
  • Prairie wolves
  • Red wolf harmless
  • Grey wolf ferocious
  • Danger of unarmed travelers in former years
  • Incidents in later years
  • Catamount and panther found in "bottom lands"
  • Grey wolf monarch of the prairie
  • Robs the tomb when famished
  • The burning of the prairie
  • Another night on the Banner
  • A thrilling incident on the great northern and southern road, passing near Peoria, Illinois
  • The country around the spot
  • Its rare beauty
  • Account of an early settler here; his preparation for winter; journey to the nearest settlement for his cow and for winter supplies
  • Mother and children left alone
  • Visit from warrior Indians
  • Sleepless night and foreboding of evil
  • She watches the prairie
  • Faint light in the distance
  • Prairie on fire
  • A conversation with our western bridegroom
  • Fearful progress of the flames, and the sublimity of the scene
  • Her terror and helplessness
  • Cabin in flames
  • The instinct of the dog saves the lives of mother and children
  • They sleep without shelter, and sustain life by a pittance of wild fruit
  • Desolation of the scene
  • A storm comes on
  • Children and mother hover around the smouldering ruins of the cabin
  • The mother sinks
  • Premature birth
  • His opinions on the woman question decidedly anti-Wollstonecraft
  • The father arrives to hear from his wife the terrible story, to witness her dying hour, and to bury mother and child in one tomb
  • His bitter grief
  • Progress of the settlers
  • Habits
  • Views of labor
  • A journey
  • Love ring
  • The next tavern
  • Amusing incidents
  • Court
  • His reasons for entering into matrimony
  • Lawyers
  • Dialogue with the driver
  • The stage-house
  • Hostess
  • The quandary
  • Indifference to the comforts of life; how induced
  • Dixonville, the Vicksburg of Illinois
  • Gang of thieves
  • Incidents there
  • Crimes of these men
  • How he would sympathize with his wife in sorrow, with a practical illustration
  • The landlord
  • The night
  • Departure
  • Pleasant ride with the New England farmer
  • Arrival among friends
  • Three guests in one cabin
  • Fun
  • "Smudging" muskitos
  • Climate of the west
  • The new town in prospect
  • Western steamboats in general
  • Her story and disposition to lighten the darker shades of his doctrines
  • The eccentric man its founder
  • His removal to the west
  • The inhabitants of the town
  • The sea captain
  • Our host
  • His wife; a pattern of excellence
  • Our amusements and visits in the neighborhood
  • Departure
  • Early settlers
  • Emigrants
  • Improved conduct of the boat
  • The emigrant supplants the Sucker; the reason
  • Their different views of life
  • Hospitality of the people of the prairie
  • Their daily food and method of preparing it
  • Morals of the people
  • Religious sects
  • The circuit preacher
  • Style of preaching
  • An amusing character
  • Happy effect of their ministry
  • Politeness of her captain
  • Excursions
  • Visit to the burial grounds and council house of the Sauks
  • Reflections
  • A tour through the prairie country
  • Anecdotes and dialogues
  • Tour continued
  • Amusing incidents
  • Tour continued
  • Dialogues with the settlers
  • Cheerless hotel
  • Our style of conversation pantomimic on my part
  • Tour ended
  • Happy residence at Alton; its social aspect more like the eastern cities
  • Beauty of the country
  • The picnic
  • Delightful close of the day
  • Return to our former residence
  • Change in the place -
  • Landing
  • Pokerton
  • Starting for our final destination
  • The country, the road, the slues
  • Their peculiar character demonstrated
  • Woodland and its principal inhabitants
  • The Banner in particular
  • Prairie Lodge
  • Our meeting
  • Sun-bonnets, veils, gloves, etc.
  • Environments of Prairie Lodge
  • Its neighbors
  • A horticultural curiosity
  • Preparing for tea
  • Partaking it
  • The evening
  • Who were present, and how we spent it
  • Her captain and crew
  • Prairie life begun
  • Rambles in the groves and over the prairies
  • Visits on horseback
  • An afternoon with a neighbor three miles distant
  • Amusing details of this visit, a fair specimen of the social visiting of the country
  • Commencement of Sucker life
  • Our next neighbor
  • The mother Meg Merrilies
  • The house; its architecture
  • The grounds; how laid out and adorned
  • Hooshier bride and bridegroom
  • The children; their pastimes
  • The father; his political and social position
  • Another house; the spirit which reigned in it
  • Beauty of order and purity in domestic life
  • Spring around Prairie Lodge
  • Showers
  • Thunderstorms at night
  • Their sublimity
  • Their effect on the landscape
  • Pleasures of the season
  • A walk in St. Louis
  • Strawberry
  • Quail
  • Scene from his domestic life
  • Grouse; his habits
  • Spring morning in the prairies
  • Bob-o-link
  • Woodpecker
  • Parroquet
  • Crow
  • Buzzard
  • A horrible tale of lynching
  • Wild turkey
  • Cattle on the prairie
  • Hare
  • Deer
  • Whippoor-Will
  • The tale of sorrow
  • Sickness of strangers on first arriving in the country
  • Their claims to hospitality
  • The solitary man's settlement in the west
  • His wife; their love; their progress and prospects
  • Departure from St. Louis
  • A remarkable series of thunder-storms
  • The pestilence which followed
  • The husband and wife both prostrated
  • The death of the wife and infant
  • His grief
  • Their grave
  • The beauty of the spot
  • Reasons for the attachment of the prairie settler to his home
  • A rare opportunity for seeing the natives of our region
  • The menagerie; getting to it
  • Effect of these changes on the mind
  • A mournful tale
  • A visit to Prairie Lodge
  • Departure from the west
  • Story and legends of the Indian
  • The prospects of this country
  • Its future greatness
Control code
17953799
Dimensions
23 cm.
Extent
xxxv, 269 p.
Isbn
9780252060397
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
88014369
System control number
  • (OCoLC)ocm17953799
  • 756140
Label
Life in prairie land, by Eliza W. Farnham ; introduction by John Hallwas
Publication
Note
Reprint. Originally published: New York : Harper, 1846
Bibliography note
Bibliography: p. xxix-xxxv
Contents
  • The first night on board the Banner
  • Style of locomotion
  • Tyler; his peculiarities, ill luck, gait, &c.; his companion
  • Our arrival
  • Street dialogue
  • Discussion of the show
  • Entrance
  • Appearance of the crowd; their motley dress
  • A character; his garb
  • Another; her dress; stature; recognition
  • Her sensibility and comments on the performances
  • The next morning
  • Her description of the male personage before introduced
  • His stories of the wars and himself
  • An invitation
  • The departure for home
  • Discussion of persons and things
  • Legal document
  • Close of the day
  • Delicate foot-print
  • Leaving Prairie Lodge
  • Difficulty of finding another home
  • Speed of our boat
  • What it proves when found
  • Its mistress
  • Her housekeeping
  • Committee on dress
  • A walk
  • What it decides
  • Resignation under desperate circumstances
  • A discovery
  • A cup of joy dashed before it is partaken
  • First night in the Sucker home
  • Junction of the Missouri and Mississippi
  • Room mates, furniture, &c.
  • Pony
  • Rebellion; how maintained
  • Sabbath
  • Next day; its deeds
  • The house; its decorations
  • The surprise anticipated
  • Comment of my neighbor
  • Settled
  • Toilet apparatus
  • Landing at Alton
  • Difficulty of retaining it
  • A new proposition rejected with some spirit at first
  • How acceded to finally
  • Our host; his origin, fortunes, opinions, &c.
  • His daughter Sidney and her husband
  • Their mode of life
  • Sidney's household affairs
  • Her culinary arts
  • How she was initiated into them
  • Fruit groves
  • Unpardonable behavior of the boat under trying circumstances
  • Wanderings in them
  • Serpents
  • Caught in Boots
  • Western housekeeping
  • Another visit
  • Temperate meal
  • The consequence
  • Moonlight nights
  • Coeur de Lion and his suite
  • Their nocturnal ramblings
  • Disaster to the captain
  • Shamefully terminated
  • Coeur de Lion's resignation
  • Better quarters completed
  • Disappointment
  • Housekeeping
  • Architecture of our dwelling
  • Grounds, &c., as described by Mr. F
  • My own picture of them
  • Our neighborhood
  • Interior of the house
  • A specimen of Hooshier indignation
  • The town
  • Our first night at home
  • Housekeeping
  • Purchases; how disposed of
  • Our family
  • Susannah
  • Pony; her artlessness and patience
  • Deserved eulogium
  • Our town; its first settlement
  • Yankees as early settlers
  • Leaving Alton we discover that Jersey is on board
  • Character of our population
  • Political and religious faith
  • Mrs. Esculapius; her remarkable gifts
  • Deacon Cantwyne; his piety, charity, &c.
  • Our village doctor; his wonderful gait
  • His partner Pomp
  • How they did business
  • The doctor's musical efforts
  • Fire on the prairie
  • Wood parties
  • A day on an island
  • The orchard
  • The parrighee of the moon
  • Sporting parties
  • Tragical termination of one
  • The grocery next door to us
  • Horrible event
  • Something more of my housekeeping
  • Making bread
  • My purveyor
  • My first dinner
  • Embarkation for the Illinois
  • Who Jersey is
  • Cook, lamb, &c.
  • Winter on the prairies
  • Sleigh rides
  • Cold houses
  • Fickleness of the climate
  • Deer-hunting in winter
  • Mode of building and style of dwellings
  • Winter evenings
  • Navigation suspended
  • Treacherous ice
  • Some of his experience during his travels
  • Opening of spring
  • A spring night
  • Features and voice of nature
  • Wild fowl
  • Steamboats
  • Magnitude of streams
  • Speculation
  • New arrivals
  • Opening farms
  • Breaking prairie
  • His political opinions
  • Making fence
  • Planting trees
  • Removal
  • Return to Prairie Lodge
  • Painful apprehensions
  • How dispelled
  • Their return
  • Reminiscences of early life
  • The progress of the destroyer
  • The final scene
  • Peculiar style of expressing them
  • Another mission of death
  • Agonizing memories
  • Pestilence abroad
  • Drought
  • Character of the illness caused by it
  • Gloom and grief
  • Dawn of new light
  • Birds and animals of prairie land
  • The gopher; its curious habits
  • Prairie fox
  • His notions on travel
  • Prairie dog
  • Prairie wolves
  • Red wolf harmless
  • Grey wolf ferocious
  • Danger of unarmed travelers in former years
  • Incidents in later years
  • Catamount and panther found in "bottom lands"
  • Grey wolf monarch of the prairie
  • Robs the tomb when famished
  • The burning of the prairie
  • Another night on the Banner
  • A thrilling incident on the great northern and southern road, passing near Peoria, Illinois
  • The country around the spot
  • Its rare beauty
  • Account of an early settler here; his preparation for winter; journey to the nearest settlement for his cow and for winter supplies
  • Mother and children left alone
  • Visit from warrior Indians
  • Sleepless night and foreboding of evil
  • She watches the prairie
  • Faint light in the distance
  • Prairie on fire
  • A conversation with our western bridegroom
  • Fearful progress of the flames, and the sublimity of the scene
  • Her terror and helplessness
  • Cabin in flames
  • The instinct of the dog saves the lives of mother and children
  • They sleep without shelter, and sustain life by a pittance of wild fruit
  • Desolation of the scene
  • A storm comes on
  • Children and mother hover around the smouldering ruins of the cabin
  • The mother sinks
  • Premature birth
  • His opinions on the woman question decidedly anti-Wollstonecraft
  • The father arrives to hear from his wife the terrible story, to witness her dying hour, and to bury mother and child in one tomb
  • His bitter grief
  • Progress of the settlers
  • Habits
  • Views of labor
  • A journey
  • Love ring
  • The next tavern
  • Amusing incidents
  • Court
  • His reasons for entering into matrimony
  • Lawyers
  • Dialogue with the driver
  • The stage-house
  • Hostess
  • The quandary
  • Indifference to the comforts of life; how induced
  • Dixonville, the Vicksburg of Illinois
  • Gang of thieves
  • Incidents there
  • Crimes of these men
  • How he would sympathize with his wife in sorrow, with a practical illustration
  • The landlord
  • The night
  • Departure
  • Pleasant ride with the New England farmer
  • Arrival among friends
  • Three guests in one cabin
  • Fun
  • "Smudging" muskitos
  • Climate of the west
  • The new town in prospect
  • Western steamboats in general
  • Her story and disposition to lighten the darker shades of his doctrines
  • The eccentric man its founder
  • His removal to the west
  • The inhabitants of the town
  • The sea captain
  • Our host
  • His wife; a pattern of excellence
  • Our amusements and visits in the neighborhood
  • Departure
  • Early settlers
  • Emigrants
  • Improved conduct of the boat
  • The emigrant supplants the Sucker; the reason
  • Their different views of life
  • Hospitality of the people of the prairie
  • Their daily food and method of preparing it
  • Morals of the people
  • Religious sects
  • The circuit preacher
  • Style of preaching
  • An amusing character
  • Happy effect of their ministry
  • Politeness of her captain
  • Excursions
  • Visit to the burial grounds and council house of the Sauks
  • Reflections
  • A tour through the prairie country
  • Anecdotes and dialogues
  • Tour continued
  • Amusing incidents
  • Tour continued
  • Dialogues with the settlers
  • Cheerless hotel
  • Our style of conversation pantomimic on my part
  • Tour ended
  • Happy residence at Alton; its social aspect more like the eastern cities
  • Beauty of the country
  • The picnic
  • Delightful close of the day
  • Return to our former residence
  • Change in the place -
  • Landing
  • Pokerton
  • Starting for our final destination
  • The country, the road, the slues
  • Their peculiar character demonstrated
  • Woodland and its principal inhabitants
  • The Banner in particular
  • Prairie Lodge
  • Our meeting
  • Sun-bonnets, veils, gloves, etc.
  • Environments of Prairie Lodge
  • Its neighbors
  • A horticultural curiosity
  • Preparing for tea
  • Partaking it
  • The evening
  • Who were present, and how we spent it
  • Her captain and crew
  • Prairie life begun
  • Rambles in the groves and over the prairies
  • Visits on horseback
  • An afternoon with a neighbor three miles distant
  • Amusing details of this visit, a fair specimen of the social visiting of the country
  • Commencement of Sucker life
  • Our next neighbor
  • The mother Meg Merrilies
  • The house; its architecture
  • The grounds; how laid out and adorned
  • Hooshier bride and bridegroom
  • The children; their pastimes
  • The father; his political and social position
  • Another house; the spirit which reigned in it
  • Beauty of order and purity in domestic life
  • Spring around Prairie Lodge
  • Showers
  • Thunderstorms at night
  • Their sublimity
  • Their effect on the landscape
  • Pleasures of the season
  • A walk in St. Louis
  • Strawberry
  • Quail
  • Scene from his domestic life
  • Grouse; his habits
  • Spring morning in the prairies
  • Bob-o-link
  • Woodpecker
  • Parroquet
  • Crow
  • Buzzard
  • A horrible tale of lynching
  • Wild turkey
  • Cattle on the prairie
  • Hare
  • Deer
  • Whippoor-Will
  • The tale of sorrow
  • Sickness of strangers on first arriving in the country
  • Their claims to hospitality
  • The solitary man's settlement in the west
  • His wife; their love; their progress and prospects
  • Departure from St. Louis
  • A remarkable series of thunder-storms
  • The pestilence which followed
  • The husband and wife both prostrated
  • The death of the wife and infant
  • His grief
  • Their grave
  • The beauty of the spot
  • Reasons for the attachment of the prairie settler to his home
  • A rare opportunity for seeing the natives of our region
  • The menagerie; getting to it
  • Effect of these changes on the mind
  • A mournful tale
  • A visit to Prairie Lodge
  • Departure from the west
  • Story and legends of the Indian
  • The prospects of this country
  • Its future greatness
Control code
17953799
Dimensions
23 cm.
Extent
xxxv, 269 p.
Isbn
9780252060397
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
88014369
System control number
  • (OCoLC)ocm17953799
  • 756140

Library Locations

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      100 Library Drive, Rochester, MI, 48309, US
      42.67267 -83.215767

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